Photo Information

Randy Perdue, the training director at the West Virginia Corrections Academy, as he teaches a Leadership Mastery seminar to officers and staff noncommissioned officers from 8th Engineer Support Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 25, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, March 9, 2010, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. Perdue, a retired Marine first sergeant, travels up and down the East Coast teaching the seminar to company employees, students at correctional academies and anyone else interested in receiving the training. The leadership seminar focused on self-improvement, including health, nutrition, rest and physical activity—all factors that contribute to someone’s overall well-being and ability to effectively lead. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Meghan J. Canlas)

Photo by Cpl. Meghan J. Canlas

8th Engineers take leadership to new levels

12 Mar 2010 | Cpl. Meghan J. Canlas

Some people were born to be great leaders, some people were put into situations where they were molded into great leaders and some continue to develop a leadership style that works for them. But no matter what the situation, everyone has room for improvement.

That was the thought as the staff noncommissioned officers and commissioned officers of 8th Engineer Support Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 25, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, attended the Leadership Mastery seminar taught by Randy Perdue, the training director at West Virginia Corrections Academy, aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., March 9.

Perdue, a retired Marine first sergeant, travels up and down the East Coast teaching the seminar to company employees, students at correctional academies and anyone else interested in receiving the training.

The leadership seminar focused on self-improvement, including health, nutrition, rest and physical activity—all factors that contribute to someone’s overall well-being and ability to effectively lead.

Another critical factor of good leadership Perdue covered was organization.

“A leader's ability to organize is essential in being timely with responses and thorough in completion of tasks,” said 1st Lt. Stacey Lanham, the adjutant for 8th ESB.  “

Lanham, a 2006 U.S. Naval Academy graduate, said being a good leader is important because of the challenges Marines face on a day-to-day basis.

“It’s important to be a good leader of Marines because the responsibility we are entrusted with as leaders requires a great deal of mental and physical fortitude, which ultimately sets the example for others to emulate,” she said.

Although only the officers and SNCOs of the battalion were in attendance during the course, Lanham said a good way to bring back the training to your junior Marines would be to hold small-unit periods of military education. This would allow them to engage in group discussions and learn from each other’s individual perspectives through an open discussion forum.  

“The same information learned at the seminar can be disseminated to junior personnel,” she said. 

Overall, the Marines and sailors of 8th ESB enjoyed the seminar and said it was a good change to the usual leadership discussions, and in the future would like to receive more seminars similar to this one.

“There needs to be more,” Lanham stated.  “We have such impacting roles in the Marine Corps as leaders, a seminar like the one we had today, as a united team of staff NCOs and officers in an unfamiliar venue, really lended to the environment that we were having a ‘special’ PME… it was one intended for our edification and to benefit those we lead.”


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