Photo Information

Gunnery Sgt. Joseph Janez, a career planner with Combat Logistics Regiment 2, swims through one of the deeper mud puddles during the endurance course at Camp Lejeune, N.C., April 22, 2016. The unit pushed through the grueling 3.4 mile course to improve their ability to work as a team and to build camaraderie.

Photo by Lance Cpl. Brianna Gaudi

CLR-2 takes on the E-Course

23 Apr 2016 | Lance Cpl. Brianna Gaudi II Marine Expeditionary Force

Marines with Combat Logistics Regiment 2 conducted an endurance course to improve their ability to work as a team and to build camaraderie at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, April 22, 2016.

The endurance course is a grueling 3.4 mile trail that incorporates several challenging obstacles and deep pools of muddy water. Among the obstacles are walls, rope swings and concertina wire which the Marines must low crawl under, through mud.

“We conduct the course two or three times a year, and it emphasizes to us how important it is to stay in shape,” said Cpl. Shaquille Felder, a supply administration specialist with CLR-2.

Several of the obstacles require teamwork, forcing the Marines to work together as a whole and build relationships throughout the duration of the course.

“Training like this brings camaraderie to the unit and I’m expecting that after today we’ll be a lot closer as a group,” Felder said.

Each Marine is different in their physical capabilities, but team work, persistence and motivation were all key factors in completing the course.

“We’re not going to leave a Marine behind,” said 2nd Lt. James Teasdale, a logistics officer with CLR 2. “So if someone is falling behind we’re going to be right there with them motivating and pushing them through.”

The course is as of a mental challenge as it is a physical one and pushes the Marines beyond their limit. It offers a different experience for units who go through.

“The biggest takeaway I’d say for this course is the teamwork,” said Teasdale. “You might be a rock star, but when you come face to face with those obstacles, you need the support of every Marine in the unit to complete the task.”

After the exercise was complete, the Marines consolidated to discuss their strengths and what they hope to improve on.

“I believe the Marines did really well, everyone completed the course, and it goes down as a win in my books,” Teasdale said.

More Media

Resources

Click for COVID-19 InformationReport Suspicious ActivityDStress Hotline