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2nd Marine Logistics Group

 

2nd Marine Logistics Group

II Marine Expeditionary Force

Camp Lejeune, N.C.

8th Engineer Support Battalion Photos

U.S. Marines with 8th Engineer Support Battalion celebrate the change of command on Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, June 19, 2019. During the ceremony Lt. Col. Patrick G. Manson relquished command to Lt. Col. Robert Gerbracht
U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Robert P. Gerbracht, left, and Lt. Col. Patrick G. Manson, right, commanding officer of 8th Engineer Support Battalion, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, stand at attention during a change of command ceremony at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, June 19, 2019. During the ceremony, Manson relinquished command of 8th ESB to Gerbracht
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Shane Pizzuto with Bulk Fuel Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion (ESB), 2nd Marine Logistics Group, unscrews a bolt on a fuel hose clamp during a Bulk Fuel exercise at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, June 19, 2019 The Marines with 8th ESB ran fuel lines, patrolled the fuel sites and provided all around security to remain proficient in fueling support operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adaezia L. Chavez)
U.S. Marines with Bulk Fuel Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion (ESB), 2nd Marine Logistics Group, utilize a hose-reel system to lay down a fuel line during a Bulk Fuel exercise at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, June 19, 2019. The Marines with 8th ESB ran fuel lines, patrolled the fuel sites and provided all around security to remain proficient in fueling support operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adaezia L. Chavez)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Ivan Quirino with Bulk Fuel Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion (ESB), 2nd Marine Logistics Group, un-reels a fuel hose during a Bulk Fuel exercise at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, June 19, 2019. The Marines with 8th ESB ran fuel lines, patrolled the fuel sites and provided all around security to remain proficient in fueling support operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adaezia L. Chavez)
U.S. Marines with 8th Engineer Support Battalion, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, and a Norwegian soldier breach a door during an urban-breaching range in Skjold Leir, Norway, May 29, 2019. The Marines of 8th ESB deployed to Norway to participate in exercise Thunder Reindeer 19, a multilateral, combined-arms, live-fire exercise between the Norwegian Armed Forces and U.S. Marine Corps. Training conducted during the deployment increases interoperability with Norwegian allies, and improves the Marine Corps’ cold-weather and mountain-warfare proficiencies. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Larisa Chavez
U.S. Marines with 8th Engineer Support Battalion, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, and a Norwegian soldier prepare to arm a breaching charge during an urban-breaching range in Skjold Leir, Norway, May 29, 2019. The Marines of 8th ESB deployed to Norway to participate in exercise Thunder Reindeer 19, a multilateral, combined-arms, live-fire exercise between the Norwegian Armed Forces and U.S. Marine Corps. Training conducted during the deployment increases interoperability with Norwegian allies, and improves the Marine Corps’ cold-weather and mountain-warfare proficiencies. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Larisa Chavez)
Featured News
Eliminating the threat: EOD conducts low-order demolition range

By LCpl Leynard Kyle Plazo | 2nd Marine Logistics Group | December 4, 2017

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Marines with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion fought fire with fire as they conducted a low-order demolition range at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, Nov. 30, 2017.

The 8th ESB Marines conducted the range in order to improve their confidence and ability to perform low-order demolition.

“A low-order technique is trying to get rid of an explosive without having it detonate,” said Sgt. Caleb Johnson, an explosive ordnance technician with the unit. “We are instead trying to make the explosive components inside the ordnance burn out which essentially keeps it from blowing up and protects the surrounding area.”

The technique is implemented when explosive ordnance is deemed too dangerous to move commonly used within towns, schools or residential areas to prevent collateral damage. Low-order demolition involves placing a small explosive device on the target with the goal of penetrating the outer shell, which burns out the explosive components inside, thereby minimizing the blast.

“We implemented a variety of techniques in conducting low-order demolition on different types of explosives,” said Johnson. “The training is a lot of experimenting to see what works and what doesn’t, so when we go out to a real life scenario, we’ll know what to do.”

Performing low-order demolition applies in situations that could arise in both domestically populated areas and deployed environments.

“This training is important, especially when we conduct state-side response,” said GySgt. Anthony J. Stanks, a section leader with the unit. “On occasion, we support local law enforcement in situations such as when ordnance washes up on the beach.”

EOD Marines with 8th ESB train in low-order demolition multiple times throughout the year to sharpen their skills in order to maintain expeditionary readiness.


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Mission

To provide general engineering support to Marine Expeditionary Forces encompassing mobility enhancement, including the employment of standard bridging, survivability, explosive ordnance disposal, the provision of tactical utilities support, production and storage of bulk water, and general supply support incident to the handling, storage and distribution of bulk fuel. To be prepared to support missions surpassing the organic engineer capability of the Marine Division and Marine Air Wing.

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